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Author Topic:   Best Dobro Instructional Video?
Alan Kirk
Member

From: Santa Barbara, CA, USA

posted 26 January 2003 11:58 AM     profile   send email     edit
I'm about to buy another reso instructional video or two, and I'm looking for advice. I'm a beinning-intermediate player.

I saw one called "Styles of the Dobro" tha claims to teach the styles of Oswald, Graves, Auldridge and Douglas. Any opinions?

I'm curious about "60 Hot Licks for Dobro" by McCasland.

Also, can anyone compare the relative merits of the Cashdollar, Huckabee, Phillips and Auldridge videos?

(I've already worked through the Jerry Douglas video.)

Thanks.

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Lincoln Goertzen
Member

From: Rose Prairie, British Columbia, Canada

posted 27 January 2003 06:29 PM     profile   send email     edit
I have Tim McCasland's 60 Hot Licks for Dobro. It would probably be around your level. It's not bad, I was just looking for something more advanced, I guess. But for a beginner/intermediate level, it is a pretty good price.

Lincoln Goertzen

Alan Kirk
Member

From: Santa Barbara, CA, USA

posted 27 January 2003 07:01 PM     profile   send email     edit
I guess people aren't very anxious to let their opinions be known on this subject. Could that be because so many of the people who made the instructional videos frequent the forum?

Let me rephrase my query: What's the best dobro instructional video, in your opinion, and why?

Thanks.

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Kenny Davis
Member

From: Great State of Oklahoma

posted 27 January 2003 07:06 PM     profile   send email     edit
Mike Auldridge has some good videos available. I've got #BV-1, that covers techniques, and gets into a little theory. It was done a few years ago, but is good learning.

Rob Ickes video series (2 tapes) is also good. He spends time on scales, playing back-up, rhythm chops, as well as the more elementary basics.

Stephen Gambrell
Member

From: Ware Shoals, South Carolina, USA

posted 27 January 2003 07:54 PM     profile   send email     edit
Alan, I really don't think anybody's afraid to voice his opinion on this, BUT----If you can understand, and do, everything on the Douglas tape, why would you need to watch any more videos? I'm not trying to put you down, now, just the opposite. But if you've got an ear, and have mastered "Cincinnatti Rag," then you just need to be PLAYING!
But, be that as it may, Mike Auldridge is an excellent teacher, and explains stuff really well.But if you want to pick, move down here and hook up with my band, and I'll switch back to guitar!

[This message was edited by Stephen Gambrell on 27 January 2003 at 07:55 PM.]

R. L. Jones
Member

From: Lake Charles, Louisiana, USA

posted 27 January 2003 08:08 PM     profile   send email     edit
Hey man I know where youre coming from. I bought a Jerry Douglas, Too rich for me , I gave it to a friend. Got a cindy Cashdollar, it was more my speed. Then I bought a Rob Ikes , 2 Tape set, Its pretty good. Thrn I got one thats " A lick A Minute" , pretty good too. I believe the trick is ,to practice practise etc

I never try to play any of this fancy stuff, I play the old fashionstyle, like Oswald .

good luck , whatever you choose

R. L.

Alan Kirk
Member

From: Santa Barbara, CA, USA

posted 27 January 2003 09:08 PM     profile   send email     edit
Stephen,

Sure I understand the stuff on the Douglas tape. But as far as doing goes, I'm still working on that. I didn't mean to imply that I'd mastered everything on the Douglas tape.

In one of the interviews in The Resophonic and the Pickers, one of the pickers (I forget which one), I think, recommended getting every dobro video and learning everything you can -- instead of spending 20 years hoping you discover everything by accident and still not learning it all.

I can't afford to buy every dobro tape on the Elderly website -- there's probably a thousand bucks' worth -- so I thought I'd ask for recommendations.

Thanks, guys.

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[This message was edited by Alan Kirk on 27 January 2003 at 09:09 PM.]

Gary Anwyl
Member

From: Palo Alto, CA

posted 27 January 2003 10:56 PM     profile   send email     edit
I'm a "borderline-intermediate" dobro player . I found the Rob Ickes Vol 2 dobro tape very useful. It's some good material on how to play bluesy licks and how to back up a singer. I felt like I picked up a number of new ideas from the tape.
Alan Kirk
Member

From: Santa Barbara, CA, USA

posted 27 January 2003 11:29 PM     profile   send email     edit
Gary's picking up a number of new ideas from a tape is exactly the reason I think I'd like to work with a bunch of different tapes. Each picker is going to have a slightly different take on the instrument. Each one is going to emphasis some things over others. Each one is going to offer his own special insights, philosophies and techniques. Sometimes it's nice to be able to watch the physical aspects, too, like hand positions and movement, vibrato, etc.

But you're right, Stephen, about needing to have an ear. There's a lot to be said for just listening and trying to imitate the masters. (I think Jerry Douglas said he used to listen to Josh Graves and try to get the same sound.)

[This message was edited by Alan Kirk on 27 January 2003 at 11:33 PM.]

Stephen Gambrell
Member

From: Ware Shoals, South Carolina, USA

posted 28 January 2003 02:55 PM     profile   send email     edit
Alan, if you listen to Auldridge early on, you could tell HE'D listened to Josh. And if you listen to Jerry when he was a teenager playing summers with the Country Gentlemen, HE sounded like Mike. And so it goes....
Course, Josh goes back to Cliff Carlisle, etc., etc.
Page Wood
Member

From: Los Angeles

posted 28 January 2003 05:38 PM     profile   send email     edit
I like the Homespun series (Brozman, Cashdollar, Phillips) because there's a little booklet of tab that follows each lesson- very helpful. 2 other good tapes are from Mickey Cochran's Folk of the Wood.
Gary Anwyl
Member

From: Palo Alto, CA

posted 28 January 2003 11:00 PM     profile   send email     edit
I know Alan is asking for video recommendations, but I feel that I should mention that for me the Stacey Phillips book The Complete Dobro Player has been the most useful piece of instructional material. There are two CDs that accompany the book that I believe are sold separately. It has lots of good material on improvisation, theory and different musical styles. There are also lots of good recorded examples with tab.
HowardR
Member

From: N.Y.C.,N.Y.

posted 29 January 2003 07:18 AM     profile   send email     edit
I'll agree with Gary. I wanted to post likewise, but since the topic refered to video, I was hesitant, but now that I can use Gary as a buffer, I'll throw in my 2 sense.....

As it was stated above, each video brings something different to the table and it's a good idea to view and practice with at least several of them. Alan, you can certainly buy one or two, use them, sell them, and go on to others. There always seems to be a buyer for used instructional material.

I think that once your basic intermediate abilities and techniques are established, the video portion itself is not a necessity (except for Cindy Cashdollar's, of course ).

The Stacy Phillips Complete Dobro book & CD is quite a comprehensive package that covers so many styles/players, techniques, theory, and various genres of music. Country, Hawaiian, Old Timey, Jazz, Western Swing, Bluegrass, Blues,...it's all there. Everything that you would want or need to know is here. This is a CD and book that all serious players should have.

Now, I'll mention this to take it a step further, and then start a new thread. The instructional material available today is wonderful. We're fortunate that we have our pick of stellar players in which to learn from, and learn from them we certainly do. There is however nothing better than a one on one personal lesson. I recently received a personal instruction CD, made for me, with my specific requests from Jim Heffernan.

As I said,I'll continue this later on a separate thread because I feel that this deserves its own platform.

BTW, this is a long post for me. That's because I'm working with the Jody Carver instructional video, "The Complete Forum Poster". I highly recommend it. He covers long posts, drawn out posts, & extended posts. This is the best instruction on how to use up vast amounts of bandwidth. He is reading this now and I will be graded.....downgraded.....

Alan Kirk
Member

From: Santa Barbara, CA, USA

posted 29 January 2003 07:19 AM     profile   send email     edit
Gary and HowardR,

I was just looking at some excerpts on the web from Stacey's book. There's some great stuff on bar slanting. I'll probably buy the book/CD set. He seems to have a good grasp of theory and is able to present it in a clear, concise manner. (I appreciate that. I'm a Teaching Assistant for an Intro to Music Theory class at the U of CA at Santa Barbara.)

[This message was edited by Alan Kirk on 29 January 2003 at 07:58 AM.]

Stephen Gambrell
Member

From: Ware Shoals, South Carolina, USA

posted 29 January 2003 05:29 PM     profile   send email     edit
Yeah, I completely forgot Heffernan. He's a great player, a real nice guy, and a good teacher, from what I hear.

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