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  Charlie Parker's "Cool Blues" C6/A7 non pedal

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Author Topic:   Charlie Parker's "Cool Blues" C6/A7 non pedal
Jesse Pearson
Member

From: San Diego , CA

posted 07 February 2004 07:27 PM     profile     
This is a popular jazz blues with Bop players. Charlie Parker recorded it in the key of Bb, I tabbed it out in the key of C (just move everything down two frets if you want the key of Bb). The melody of Cool Blues is completely based on the 4 measure phrase which Parker played in his solo on the final take of Yardbird Suite recorded a year earlier. This version was recorded on February 19, 1947. The chords are the basic outline, you can reharmonize where you feel like it. Use a forward slant going into the 5th measure F7, it sets up the picking nicely. I like swinging this tune on the slower side of the Bop scale.
 
F9#4
E|-------|
C|-------|
A|-12----| 3rd
G|-12----| 9th
E|-11----| b7
C#|-10----| #4


COOL BLUES Charlie Parker
Jazz blues Bop
Tabbed by Jesse Pearson
C6/A7 Tuning


C F7 C C7

E|----------------------|----------------|------------|----------|
C|---------------12-11--|------------7---|------------|----------|
A|---12---------------12|-10-------7---5-|---5--------|----------|
G|-12--12-----12--------|---10-----------|-5----------|----------|
E|-------12-13----------|-----10-5-------|------------|----------|
C#|----------------------|----------------|------------|----------|


F7 F7 C Em7 Ebm7
E|-----------------------|----------------|------------|----------|
C|----------------12-11--|------------7---|------------|----------|
A|---12----------------12|-10-------7---5-|---5--------|----------|
G|-12--12---10-12--------|---10-----------|-5----------|----------|
E|-------11--------------|-----10-5-------|------------|----------|
C#|-----------------------|----------------|------------|----------|



Dm7 G7 C
E|----------------------|----------------|------------|----------| |
C|---------------12-11--|------------7---|------------|----------| |
A|---12---------------12|-10-------7---5-|---5--------|----------| |
G|-12--12-----12--------|---10-----------|-5----------|----------| |
E|-------12-13----------|-----10-5-------|------------|----------| |
C#|----------------------|----------------|------------|----------| |

[This message was edited by Jesse Pearson on 30 December 2005 at 08:48 AM.]

John Steele
Member

From: Renfrew, Ontario, Canada

posted 07 February 2004 08:55 PM     profile     
Cool Jesse, thanks.
I love this cut, because it brings 3 biggies together for me. I love Charlie Parker, and Erroll Garner has had a large influence too. They didn't quite gel I guess, but I'm glad they recorded together.
Who's the third party ? I guess this is arguable, but to me this phrase is one of many that Parker used which laid bare his debt to Lester Young.
Another very Lester-like phrase in the Parker vocabulary was the opening two bar phrase of "Ornithology". That's just my opinion, but...
Thanks!
-John

------------------
www.ottawajazz.com

Andy Volk
Member

From: Boston, MA

posted 08 February 2004 04:49 AM     profile     
A classic Parker head! Nice, Jesse. After playing around with it and listening to Parker's phrasing, this feels more natural to me at tempo - more of a Hawaiian approach, I guess, with a paraphrase in double stops substituting for your 10th fret run. The triplets are played very fast ... the first as a gliss, the 2nd as a hammer-on.

C F7 C C7

3 3
_____ _____
| | | | |
E|----3-5-3--0-3-0-----8-7---|----5-----------|------------|----------|
C|--4--------------5-7-----9-|--7-5------7----|------------|----------|
A|---------------------------|--7-----7----5--|---5--------|----------|
G|---------------------------|----------------|-5----------|----------|
E|---------------------------|----------------|------------|----------|
C#|---------------------------|----------------|------------|----------|

[This message was edited by Andy Volk on 08 February 2004 at 04:54 AM.]

Denny Turner
Member

From: Northshore Oahu, Hawaii USA

posted 08 February 2004 07:41 AM     profile     
Great stuff Jesse. Thank You.

Aloha,
DT~

[This message was edited by Denny Turner on 08 February 2004 at 07:45 AM.]

Jesse Pearson
Member

From: San Diego , CA

posted 08 February 2004 01:34 PM     profile     
Thanks guys. Andy, I like my approach much better because the triplets are right there.

Did you catch the foreward slant in Bar 5 on strings 5, 4, and 3. The slant seems to bring out the sound of the b7 of the F7(Eb) better (b3rd of the C scale)and make it easier to play. See how the 3rd of the C and the b7 of the F7 are important tones against their chords and the line, plus they are just a half step away from each other. We could just as easy look at C as C7 and resolve from it's b7(Bb) to the major 3rd of the F7 (A), again smooth voice leading between chords when they change.

The last approach is one of the most common for good voice leading in a
ii-V-I progression. You have to look for this and get used to finding it as the chords change from one to the other.

[This message was edited by Jesse Pearson on 10 February 2004 at 08:28 PM.]

Andy Volk
Member

From: Boston, MA

posted 08 February 2004 04:01 PM     profile     
I get your approach, Jesse, and I'm aware of the theory though I tend to look for voice leading in arpeggios and chords not melody playing. There are different ways to play the same thing on guitars unlike a flute. I hear the Parker line in a higher register and I spent so much time with Hawaiian steel early on that I tend to gravitate to long vertical stretches with tilt bar and hawaiian-style blocking. I see your approach as more of a horizontal, typical pedal steel move. Each can be valid.
Jesse Pearson
Member

From: San Diego , CA

posted 08 February 2004 04:47 PM     profile     
Andy, are your playing yours on a acoustic guitar? Your line doesn't work on my short scale Magnatone, the open string bounce kills the groove and the gliss on the triplet sounds like Indian music. The alto sax has a voice like range and sounds nice deep. It is interesting to me to see different positions for the same notes, but that line of yours is not practicle when playing a jazz head with another lead instrument IMHO. I guess thats what I was trying to say, so don't be mad. O.K?

Andy, Bird was all about voice leading in his line. There are a handful of standard bird tricks that you can juggle around for great voice leading results. I'll tab that next. You know, you mix worked out stuff with flying off the cuff stuff.

[This message was edited by Jesse Pearson on 08 February 2004 at 08:45 PM.]

Andy Volk
Member

From: Boston, MA

posted 09 February 2004 06:36 AM     profile     
Yes, an unplugged 25" scale Chandler. I really didn't spend much time thinking it through (or plugging in) so I guess it's no improvement. No big deal. More by email. I spent many years as a failed jazz guitarist so I can now devote my time to being a failed bebop steeler.
Jesse Pearson
Member

From: San Diego , CA

posted 09 February 2004 07:53 AM     profile     
Andy, you've raised a good point here. A jazz head is just that, the head. It's written so we all play and phrase the same theme for the most part, the same. What you wrote does work great for improvising and I dig it for that. The Hawaiian Steel has things that are easy to play on it and hard to play on it, only time and practice shows you where that's at. So the bottom line is, can one play a standard head with another lead instrument and groove with each other on the same notes? When I tab out a jazz head on steel, it's the same notes I'd play on sax or guitar for the most part, that's why we call it the head. The main reason I'm looking into playing jazz on steel is to learn to play Western Swing better.
Jesse Pearson
Member

From: San Diego , CA

posted 09 February 2004 01:30 PM     profile     
Here's the scale to play over F7#4 lydian dom. This scale would sound nice over plain ole F9, when used as a 4 chord in a blues. Notice how the first 4 notes are the whole tone scale.

F lydian dom. F7#4

E|------------------------------10-11-13-15-17-19-| |
C|------------------------11-12-------------------| |
A|------------------10-12-------------------------| |
G|-----------7-8-10-------------------------------| |
E|-------7-8--------------------------------------| |
C#|-4-6-8------------------------------------------| |
F G A B C D Eb F G A B C D Eb F G A B



F9 Arpeggio

E|--------------11-13-| |
C|----------12--------| |
A|----10-12-----------| |
G|-10-----------------| |
E|--------------------| |
C#|--------------------| |
R 9 3 5 b7 R
F G A C Eb F

[This message was edited by Jesse Pearson on 09 February 2004 at 05:00 PM.]

Andy Volk
Member

From: Boston, MA

posted 09 February 2004 02:39 PM     profile     
As we discussed ... cool! I'm not sure of the theory on this one but I think it's a half/ whole diminished scale. Whatever the technical answer it seems to work for an easy outside sounding run over a dominant or alterted dominant chord. You can also repeat it up four frets like diminished chords.

G7

E ---------------------------------3--4--6--7--|
C ----------------------------4--5-------------|
A ----------------------4--5-------------------|
G ----------------3--4-------------------------|
E ----------3--4-------------------------------|
C# ----3--4-------------------------------------|

[This message was edited by Andy Volk on 09 February 2004 at 02:40 PM.]

Jesse Pearson
Member

From: San Diego , CA

posted 10 February 2004 07:57 AM     profile     
Andy, thats a half step/whole step Diminished scale in E, G, Bb or C#. In blues it's used to go from the I chord to the 4 chord (Robbin Ford favorite), use the same root as the 1 chord for you 1/2 whole dim scale when used this way. Bird loved to put the b9 on Dom7 chords (V) and on the (ii) chord (b9 =b5)=(min7b5) for his ii-V progression. So in the key of C major, we are talking about the b6 of the major key, just another way of looking at it. The 7th mode of melodic minor is the super locrian scale (dim whole tone scale) and is spelled 1/2, W, 1/2, W, W, W, W steps. I think bird was into this scale alot because it works great on a ii-V. I use it over Dom7#9 or Dom7b9 all the time on ii-V progressions, it's my favorite altered dom scale.

Here's C dim half whole going to the 4 chord.

C dim half/whole scale F9#4
E|----------------------------|--------------| |
C|-12-------------------------|--------------| |
A|----13-12-------------------|-12-----------| |
G|----------12-11-------------|-12-----------| |
E|----------------12-11--9--8-|-11-----------| |
C#|----------------------------|-10-----------| |

Dim scale C Bb A G F# E Eb Db C
Dim keys C A F# Eb C


[This message was edited by Jesse Pearson on 14 February 2004 at 06:15 PM.]

Andy Volk
Member

From: Boston, MA

posted 10 February 2004 09:24 AM     profile     
Yeah, Robben Ford - that's who I stole it from. Thanks for the theory insight. Here's another pet lick ... a triplet run over a dominant chord. I think of this as a whole tone run. Is this correct? I lose my place unless I start it from the root note of the dominant chord.
[TAB]

E --15--15---13---13---11---11---9--9---7--7---5--5---3---3---1---1--|---0--|
C ---15--------13--------11-------9-------7------5-----3--------1----|---0--|
A -------------------------------------------------------------------|------|
G -------------------------------------------------------------------|------|
E -------------------------------------------------------------------|------|
C# ------------------------------------------------------------------|------|

[/TAB

[This message was edited by Andy Volk on 10 February 2004 at 09:56 AM.]

The above triplet run is over a G7 ending with C, or C6.

[This message was edited by Andy Volk on 10 February 2004 at 04:12 PM.]

John Steele
Member

From: Renfrew, Ontario, Canada

posted 10 February 2004 10:02 AM     profile     
F7#4 (also commonly called F7#11) comes from the C melodic minor scale.

To steal a portion of Jesse's scale written above:

C D Eb (F G A B C D Eb F)

ta da....

>>I'm not sure of the theory on this one
-Andy

With respect to the half-step whole-step diminished scale, what you end up with is
a 7b9 chord. They may also contain the #11 tone.

>>You can also repeat it up four frets
- Andy

err, I think you might have meant 3 frets ?

-John

------------------
www.ottawajazz.com

[This message was edited by John Steele on 10 February 2004 at 10:06 AM.]

Jesse Pearson
Member

From: San Diego , CA

posted 10 February 2004 11:17 AM     profile     
Andy, I see major thirds going down in whole steps.

John, I think it's easier to think minor 3rd intervals for the dim keys that are related to each other. I start on the root and go up in minor thirds for the related roots. Depending on if your including the root note or not that your starting from, it could be 3 or 4 frets. Your saying not to include the root note fret and Andy is including. I use both ways depending on how much Bakelite I've been smoking.

John, I like the #4 when thinking about lydian stuff since getting away from the major 3rd of the chord is the main reason for using lydian. It's a trip that we can call the same things in music by different names. I think Dom7#11 is the correct term for lydian dom, but I like to call it a raised 4th for all lydian applications myself.

[This message was edited by Jesse Pearson on 14 February 2004 at 01:02 PM.]

Andy Volk
Member

From: Boston, MA

posted 10 February 2004 12:36 PM     profile     
John, yes, what Jesse said above.

Jesse, yes major 3rds but following the pattern of a 1st string whole tone scale - your basic Claude Debussy steel guitar lick.

Jesse Pearson
Member

From: San Diego , CA

posted 10 February 2004 02:05 PM     profile     
Wow, really? I read that Bird used to go to the NY City library and study that guy, is that how you know that?

I used that approach to get to the 4 chord just like the dim half whole scale approach. I'm looking at the 4th measure C7 and doing the triplet at the 12th, 10th, 8th, and 6th frets before hitting the 4 chord F7. The triplet is 1st, 2nd, 1st string in that order. I'm playing over a C7 chord starting on it's 3rd, this is the same approach Andy was using over G7, only he started on the root of G7 instead of the 3rd of the Dom7.

[This message was edited by Jesse Pearson on 13 February 2004 at 02:01 PM.]

Andy Volk
Member

From: Boston, MA

posted 10 February 2004 04:08 PM     profile     
I'm musically educated like a swiss cheese - pungent but lots of holes. The whole tone scale was a signature of Debussy & Ravel's writing. Debussy's solo piano and harp music are whole tone scale fests. http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B00005N8DR/qid=1076458255/sr=1-10/ref=sr_1_10/103-4502569-9502200?v=glance&s=classical. I read that about Bird too (he supposedly also dug Stravinsky, Bartok and Lester Young but not necessarily in that order).

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