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  Spelling Copedent (Page 1)

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Author Topic:   Spelling Copedent
Bobby Lee
Sysop

From: Cloverdale, North California, USA

posted 04 February 2004 01:46 PM     profile     
The inventor (coiner?) of the word informs be that the proper spelling is copedent, not copedant. It derives from arrangement.

------------------
Bobby Lee - email: quasar@b0b.com - gigs - CDs, Open Hearts
Sierra Session 12 (E9), Williams 400X (Emaj9, D6), Sierra Olympic 12 (C6add9),
Sierra Laptop 8 (E6add9), Fender Stringmaster (E13, A6),
Roland Handsonic, Line 6 Variax

Dave Van Allen
Member

From: Doylestown, PA , US , Earth

posted 04 February 2004 07:38 PM     profile     
b0b... if you coin a phrase does that make you a "mintor"?
Colm Chomicky
Member

From: Prairie Village, Kansas, USA

posted 04 February 2004 08:26 PM     profile     
The answer lies just around the coiner.
Tom Olson
Member

From: Spokane, WA

posted 04 February 2004 09:36 PM     profile     
Sounds like a bunch of Bullion to me!!
Peter
Member

From: Cape Town, South Africa

posted 04 February 2004 09:59 PM     profile     
And the specialists who fix your setup for you, are they copedentists?
Jerry Hayes
Member

From: Virginia Beach, Va.

posted 05 February 2004 06:11 AM     profile     
I still have a Copedant on my Peddle Steel...JH

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Livin' in the Past and the Future with a 12 string Mooney Universal tuning.

Recluse
Member

From: Cleveland, Ohio, USA

posted 05 February 2004 09:41 AM     profile     
b0b: If I take up your cause would I be copedantic?
Steve Bailey
C Dixon
Member

From: Duluth, GA USA

posted 05 February 2004 10:24 AM     profile     
Oh my word, I can't cope with this any longer. Someone get me a tylanol please.

carl

Fred Layman
Member

From: Springfield, Missouri USA

posted 05 February 2004 02:50 PM     profile     
Carl, change the "a" to "e" in your medication to make it copacetic (or Websters permits copesetic and copasetic).
Bob Mainwaring
Member

From: Qualicum Beach Vancouver Island B.C. Canada

posted 05 February 2004 03:46 PM     profile     
Hey guys - what languashing do you think this is??

Bob. of the Z.Bs.

Mark van Allen
Member

From: loganville, Ga. USA

posted 05 February 2004 11:11 PM     profile     
So I suppose I have developed a "copedependent" relationship with my tuning...

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Stop by the Steel Store at: www.markvanallen.com

Rick Schmidt
Member

From: Carlsbad, CA. USA

posted 06 February 2004 12:12 AM     profile     
Mark...I guess now you need to join a "12 string program".
David L. Donald
Member

From: Koh Samui Island, Thailand

posted 06 February 2004 02:36 AM     profile     
Ah yes a woid to the wize
Doug Rolfe
Member

From: Indianapolis, IN

posted 06 February 2004 03:53 AM     profile     
I think this is in the rong sactshun. It belongs in humer or hummor or sumthing lack that. Donna, what do you tink?
CrowBear Schmitt
Member

From: Ariege, - PairO'knees, - France

posted 06 February 2004 06:38 AM     profile     
here we go again !
---->>>
Marco Schouten
Member

From: Amsterdam, The Netherlands

posted 06 February 2004 10:10 AM     profile     
My guitar isn't coopedenting, how 'bout yours?

------------------
Steelin' Greetings
Marco Schouten
Sho-Bud LLG; Guyatone 6 string lap steel; John Pearse bar; Emmons bar; Evans SE200 amp


Chris Forbes
Member

From: Beltsville, MD, USA

posted 06 February 2004 11:58 AM     profile     
Marco, a shot of penicillin will clear that right up.

[This message was edited by Chris Forbes on 06 February 2004 at 11:58 AM.]

Tom Bradshaw
Member

From: Concord, California, USA

posted 06 February 2004 07:49 PM     profile     
Explanation: I happened to mention to b0b that I am in the process of getting the word copedent (co-pee-dent) accepted as a real word by the Oxford English Dictionary people. They have been very receptive to the idea; even finding it intriguing that an instrument (which the person I talked to had never heard of) would have a word dedicated to it. It now appears that I should concentrate on getting them to establish a definition for "pedal steel guitar," an instrument that doesn't have an identity in the dictionary. That may be the first task to gain identity for our instrument.

As I mentioned in the past (here and in other publications), I coined this word simply to identify the combining of the pedal steel guitar's basic tuning, the alteration of that basic tuning by the utilization of its pedals and knee lever changes, and the arrangement of all of them as a group working together. Although many feel that copedent is the wrong word, no one has come up with a word that has only one meaning to describe the three components of the pedal steel. I just believe that our instrument needs a word dedicated to it, with no alternative meanings. Many like "set up" (or set-up). This combination of words means other things, and, it is actually two words.

The Oxford folks seemed to understand this and directed me to show that the word had been used for 25 years and, used in separate and independent media venues. I coined it nearly 30 years ago when writing for Guitar Player magazine. It is important that all of the independent venues spell the word the same as all the others do.

It was not my intent to create a controversy about this or see the subject deteriorate into a frivolous discussion (although I enjoyed all of the comedy here). In fact, I explained to b0b that just mentioning the spelling matter might not be appreciated.

So, that's the story. Whatever way this goes will never mean much to the world, but maybe it will to those who are seeking more identity for the pedal steel guitar. ...Tom

[This message was edited by Tom Bradshaw on 07 February 2004 at 07:34 AM.]

Patrick Ickes
Member

From: Upper Lake, CA USA

posted 06 February 2004 08:31 PM     profile     
Hi Tom,
Keep us informed on your progress to get Copedent as a real word. Thanks again for getting me into this goofy world of pedal steel guitars.
Pat
Bobby Lee
Sysop

From: Cloverdale, North California, USA

posted 06 February 2004 08:43 PM     profile     
I think the fact that we're able to joke about it demonstrates its viability as a "real word". Everyone here knows what it means, which is why the misspellings and variations are funny to steel players.

I use the word regularly, even though I think it's sort of ugly as words go, and I support Tom's efforts to get it into the dictionary.

------------------
Bobby Lee - email: quasar@b0b.com - gigs - CDs, Open Hearts
Sierra Session 12 (E9), Williams 400X (Emaj9, D6), Sierra Olympic 12 (C6add9),
Sierra Laptop 8 (E6add9), Fender Stringmaster (E13, A6),
Roland Handsonic, Line 6 Variax

Bill Llewellyn
Member

From: San Jose, CA

posted 07 February 2004 08:02 AM     profile     
BillI support the word, too. It may not roll off the tongue as nicely as some other words, but its inertia as a catch-all term for all things related to tuning, changes, pedals, levers, etc., on a PSG is pretty well established. It would be nice to see it become officialized at a higher level, like Tom is working on now.

PS: Tom, your old MSA U12 has been serving me very well for about 4-1/2 years now. Lovely guitar.

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Bill, steelin' since '99 | Steel page | My music | Steelers' birthdays | Over 50?

[This message was edited by Bill Llewellyn on 07 February 2004 at 08:13 AM.]

Colm Chomicky
Member

From: Prairie Village, Kansas, USA

posted 07 February 2004 09:34 AM     profile     
Type "copedent" into Google, you get 56 hits. Type "copedant" into Google, you get 104 hits.

So when one invents a word, it is kind of like playing Dr. Frankenstein. You create a monster that has a mind of its own and can no longer be controlled.

Bobby Lee
Sysop

From: Cloverdale, North California, USA

posted 07 February 2004 09:50 AM     profile     
See what happens when people can't find a word in the dictionary?
Nick Reed
Member

From: Springfield, TN

posted 07 February 2004 11:17 AM     profile     
I realize everyone has an opinion and that's great. . . but heres the way I feel about it. I hate that word "COPEDENT". You guys can use it if you like but I'm going to refer to it as "Pedal Setup". It's just much easier for me, since I talk in simple language. Besides others who also don't know ask me what it means, and I'm tired of trying to explain it.

Nick
(soon to be a ZumSteel owner)

Terry Wendt
Member

From: Nashville, TN, USA

posted 07 February 2004 11:40 AM     profile     
How about 'pedset' ? ?

I'm sorry we incorrectly spelled your word in the early issues of our magazine, Tom. Like it's been said though, it wasn't in the dictionary.

Good luck with your effort. But, why didn't anyone care to inform me about this???

------------------
PedalSteel.us Magazine

TheEarlyDays.com

and appearing regularly...aLotOfSpace.com
Jimmy Crawford/Russ Hicks... and Buddy Emmons on Bass!

Jack Francis
Member

From: Mesa, Arizona, USA

posted 07 February 2004 12:21 PM     profile     
b0b

Mark Twain said that he felt sorry for anyone that could only spell a word one way.

Colm Chomicky
Member

From: Prairie Village, Kansas, USA

posted 07 February 2004 02:50 PM     profile     
Too bad Mr. Smiley's computer is busted. So in his absence, I'm gonna borrow from is email signature ("that twang").

A person who set-ups up a steel guitar is a "twangerologist". The study of steel guitar set-ups is "twangerology".

So when your "twanger" ain't working, its always best to see a "twangerologist"

Ray Minich
Member

From: Limestone, New York, USA

posted 07 February 2004 05:42 PM     profile     
This is the funniest thread I have read in a long time...
I'm Co-Dependent on my Copedent(ant, int, eant, ynt).
Rich Weiss
Member

From: Woodland Hills, CA, USA

posted 07 February 2004 06:21 PM     profile     
Tom, you should get the word trademarked, licensed and copyrighted, and then everytime someone says it, you should get a little royalty.

[This message was edited by Rich Weiss on 07 February 2004 at 10:27 PM.]

Peter
Member

From: Cape Town, South Africa

posted 08 February 2004 12:06 AM     profile     
To police the royalties you need a COP.....
Never Mind.

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Peter den Hartogh-Emmons 1978 S10 - Fender Artist S10-Remington U12-Hilton Volume Pedal-Gibson BR4 lapsteel-Guya "Stringmaster" Copy-MusicMan112RP-Peavy Rage158- - My Animation College in South Africa


Tom Olson
Member

From: Spokane, WA

posted 08 February 2004 06:42 PM     profile     
Maybe it should really be chor-pe-dent, to reflect the actual spelling of CHORD, but I suppose it's too late for that and there are probably practical reasons for not doing it that way, including confusion about the pronunciation (i.e. whether the "ch" is soft or hard).
Bobby Lee
Sysop

From: Cloverdale, North California, USA

posted 08 February 2004 08:05 PM     profile     
There's already confusion about the pronunciation, and about the spelling. Getting it into the dictionary would help resolve that.

Think about it. Even steel players who hate the word know what it means. They even know what it means when you misspell it or mispronounce it. Everybody's making puns out of it. We couldn't do that if it wasn't a real word.

------------------
Bobby Lee - email: quasar@b0b.com - gigs - CDs, Open Hearts
Sierra Session 12 (E9), Williams 400X (Emaj9, D6), Sierra Olympic 12 (C6add9),
Sierra Laptop 8 (E6add9), Fender Stringmaster (E13, A6),
Roland Handsonic, Line 6 Variax

Tom Olson
Member

From: Spokane, WA

posted 08 February 2004 08:58 PM     profile     
Yup -- getting the word into the dictionary would go a long way to standardizing its spelling and pronunciation. It's interesting that even back at the time Winnie Winston wrote his book, "Pedal Steel Guitar" (early 70's), the word "copedent" was apparently already enjoying wide-spread usage among pedal steel guitarists (although it appears that the word is not spelled correctly in that book -- I never noticed that until now).
David Doggett
Member

From: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

posted 09 February 2004 08:17 AM     profile     
Tom, co-peh-dent sounds way better than co-pee-dent, and is more in line with the derivation from the word "pedal". Is it too late to change the pronunciation?

Unfortunately, even if this word goes into the unabridged Webster's or the Oxford, it is so obscure and specialized that it is highly unlikely it will get put in the smaller abridged dictionary versions most of us have on our home bookshelf.

Bobby Lee
Sysop

From: Cloverdale, North California, USA

posted 09 February 2004 03:03 PM     profile     
Until Robert Randolph starts talking about his copedent on MTV...
bob grossman
Member

From: Visalia CA USA

posted 09 February 2004 04:00 PM     profile     
Who cares about the pronunciation? Let's get rid of the word. Sorry, Tom B., Ol' Buddy, but I have never liked nor used it. I think this has been brought up before.

What's wrong with tuning? Pedal setup?

Jack Francis
Member

From: Mesa, Arizona, USA

posted 09 February 2004 04:43 PM     profile     
Leave it to someone from "The Peoples Republic of Felton" To wanna change things.
Whip Lashaway
Member

From: Sherwood, Ohio, USA

posted 10 February 2004 07:22 AM     profile     
You go Tom B. Maybe if we can expose a word like copedent to the world I won't be asked questions about that "slide bar thing". And maybe I won't hear "You sure are good on that keyboard"!!! I finally had my steel embroidered on my coat so I could just point to it when they asked "What's a steel guitar"? For years I used to answer the question with the question "Do you like Country Music"? If they said "NO" I would reply "It's the thing about Country Music you don't like"! That would usually get them to listening to Country Music with a little different ear. March on Tommy my boy I'm right in line behind you.
Whip

------------------
Whip Lashaway
Sierra E9/B6 12 string
Sierra E9/B6 14 string
78' Emmons D10 P/P

Tom Bradshaw
Member

From: Concord, California, USA

posted 10 February 2004 04:18 PM     profile     
Yes, I agree. This is a pretty funny topic.
I'd like to mention that the word "hysteresis" is used by steel guitarists all the time. They even know how to spell it and know what it means as it relates to their instrument staying in tune. Yet, it is a metallurgical term that has no relationship with the problem of a string's return (or failure to return) when changing string pitch using pedals and knee levers. I don't hear anyone complaining about that (and I'm not doing it now). Since everyone knows what the term refers to, I doubt that a metallurgist will post how inappropriate it is that we steelers have appropriated the word for our uses.

It's too late to change the word. It takes 25 years to get obscure words approved. Like Bob says, we know what the word means. We also know what philatelist means, but few people want to call anyone that who is a stamp collector.

bob grossman
Member

From: Visalia CA USA

posted 10 February 2004 04:38 PM     profile     
Jack Francis...

How'd you know I was from Felton? I'm not now.


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